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You Will Be Missed, Mr. Bicentennial Man

I have a dream: to meet all celebrity that has been my childhood "heroes". And I added a quotation on that word because what I meant by "heroes", is that they brought me laughter, inspiration, humanity, spirituality and dreams.

And one of these celebrities was my favourite comedian besides Jim Carrey. His name is Robin Williams. From my own memories, he was truly the brightest, the happiest and the kindest man ever. I never met him, but based on most of his acting career, he played a lot of kid-friendly, funny movies.

I really loved this guy when I was a kid. And I still love his movies, even the ones he played as a secondary character, most notably Night At The Museum series. He was the real reason for me to watch that movie in the first place. And God, he made me smile and laugh like I used to for a short period of time.

But he was more than a comedian. He was, of course, an actor. He produced just as much character and emotions as any passionate actor and actresses. And personally, Bicentennial Man is his best and my all-time favourite movie from my childhood days. I must have been in lower school when it came out on Star Movies. Though, I might have watched it before its released, because the time I discovered this movie on the Cable TV magazine, I was in a state of "Oh my God, this movie....this was the movie I wanted to watch again, and this was what it was called. I want to watch this again later." But maybe, it's because it was of the guy who played Alan in Jumanji.

Either way, I got to watch it. And though I was too young to understand, I understood what the whole movie was about: A robot butler wants to know what it feels like being human, and throughout his chronicles, he has become human and learns more about the human's complexity that is emotions. The movie is just the best. I cheered and embraced and teared up over every scenes, especially the ending. I remembered that I was crying out of confusion to why they ended the movie that way, and that was because I never seen any anything like it before. If you want to know what I mean by that, then I suggest that you watch the movie until the end--it is recommended. Though after re-watching the movie time and time again, I embraced the ending and find it a happy, beautiful yet tragic ending I ever seen.

Ever since I watched a tribute video of Robin Williams' movie moments, I still couldn't believe that he has gone in such an unbelievable manner. I wished I knew what made the most charming, most happiest and most brightest man on Earth brought him to a great despair. And it saddens me just seeing how amazingly, terribly fucked up this world is after the news of his death.

To one of them, I wanted to say that you don't know what it feels like being depressed. Sometimes it comes with a reason, sometimes it happens suddenly--and sometimes it is hard to go away. Robin Williams was and is not a weak person. He lived longer than you, and that means he fought depression longer than anyone ever does. And he fought depression like Peter Pan beat Captain Hook. He never seen depressed ever--he kept smiling happily even when things went down badly. That I know and I'm sure.

And I'm sure, those of the people who has suffered from depression, but still smiling is a strong person. I wished I could say more nicest, motivated words like I used to, but...

Anyway, you will be missed, Robin Williams. I really wished I could have met you before, but that will only happen in the end.

Rest In Peace,
Mr. Bicentennial Man.

My condolences to the Williams family, and to Zelda Williams. Stay strong and beautiful.